Home Based Work — Some real opportunities 2020

With unemployment at its highest level in almost three decades as of this writing, many are looking for home based work opportunities. Unfortunately, this also means work-from-home job scams are on the rise.

If you are looking for legit ways to make money through home based work then you can visit this website. They provide home based work with a decent amount of pay.

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However, they are pretty easy to avoid if you know what to look out for. The following are three things to look out for that will tell you if a home based work opportunity is real. If you keep this advice in mind, you should have no problem avoiding work-from-home job scams.

1. Application Fees: You should never have to “pay for work.” Many scammers make their opportunity seem legitimate by asking for application fees (aka application processing fee). These fees usually range from a low of $9.95 up to about $35 or $40 a pop.

Don’t fall for it. Legitimate home based work is fee-free, i.e, there are no fees of any kind — ever.

2. Personal Information: In some countries (mostly European), it is common to list personal information like age and date of birth on your resume (CV). This is not common in the United States. In fact, it’s discouraged. Giving out personal information like this (especially a Social Security number) can easily be used to steal your identity.

If a home based work opportunity asks you to fill out an online application, don’t give out your social security number or any other personal information until you’ve done your due diligence (e.g, do a web search on the company, check with the Better Business Bureau).

A resume is enough initially — no personal information beyond what is provided it is needed. If a company is serious about hiring you, there will come a time where you will have to give out personal information — but make sure there’s a real company behind it. Google them, find an address, get a telephone number, etc.

home based work
home based work

If a company is corresponding with you only by email and you never speak with an actual person or are able to find out any info about the company in a web search, don’t even consider continuing with the application process. This is a major home based work scam trick.

3. You Receive Money: Some home based work opportunities are so elaborate and seem so real that many are easily sucked in. One of the most popular of these is where you receive money. There are several variations, but it goes something like this:

You receive a check in the mail — usually for several thousand dollars. It looks authentic. It can be for anything from a foreign lottery you’ve won to government benefits (e.g, stimulus checks), to advance payment for a work-from-home job.

It has your correct name, address, and official bank name — everything. You may even call and verify that the bank is real — and it may be. You are always asked to call a number to verify/authenticate/get further instructions. And, this is the part that should send off alarm bells.

Once they get you on the phone, they’ll tell you to deposit the check and will at some point ask you to wire funds back to them for “overpayment or taxes or processing fees, etc.”

And, the check very well may “clear.” Only, not for long. By the time you’ve wired them the funds for “overpayment or taxes or processing fees,” you get a call from your bank saying that the check bounced; that it was a fraud. And you’re on the hook for the money because the crooks have disappeared.

Remember, there is no legitimate reason for any employer to give you a check or money order, then ask you to wire money anywhere in return — ever. It is always a work-from-home job scam if this happens.

#home based work scam

#home based work tips

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